Botanic garden offers wealth of biodiversity

I take issue with some of the comments I read recently in the letters column concerning the removal of pathways in Wollongong Botanic Garden's rainforest. 

The botanic garden has spent a long time procuring seeds and growing plants to plant in the rainforest, which has still a great deal to offer in terms of biodiversity in the region.

Some people don't seem to recognise the inherent value of such wildlife corridors.  

This particular one extends from Mount Keira lookout to Mangerton Park.  

The botanic garden rainforest provides a home to a variety of bird species, nocturnal life (owls, bats, nightjars etc), which are dependent upon the rainforest being wholly intact, and not segmented, as it will be if the Conservatorium of Music starts putting paths through it. 

I would also like to highlight the presence of other animals and reptiles (other than 'the odd rabbit'), which are timid, due to their size and vulnerability.  

The reason rabbits and foxes are so bold is that they are pest species in Australia, and as such, have evolved in completely different circumstances than our own native species, which knew no predators until the introduction of species such as rabbits and foxes.  

Rabbits compete with wombats and bandicoots for space in pre-dug burrows, and foxes kill and compete with our native animals for food.

The people who think the curator is 'talking tripe' don't have a monopoly on teaching our youth to become responsible adults.  

The botanic garden is also a great ambassador for the Gong.

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