Multimedia project set to transform film

The woman who would transform Wollongong's gateway into an "iconic landmark" has set her sights on another ambitious project, this time a creative hub to grow the region's documentary, film and multimedia industry.

Jan Lindrum is one of three women behind Film City, flagged as a not-for-profit production house with a strong emphasis on creative industry training and local storytelling.

Ms Lindrum's partners in the venture include Sandra Pires, of Bulli-based Why Documentaries and Bega's Hiromi Matsuoka, of Screen Illawarra South East, one of five regional offices affiliated with Screen NSW.

The women are applying for grants and appealing to financiers in the hope of setting up a headquarters in the Wollongong city centre.

"We're hoping to bring something new and inventive to the table from an education perspective," Ms Lindrum said.

"There's a massive pool of people, dripping in talent, but it's very fragmented. This is about trying to contain all that energy."

The project would draw on the contacts and experience of Ms Matsuoka, who has brought key industry professionals from Sydney to teach skills to fledgling Illawarra filmmakers as part of her work for Screen Illawarra South East.

Ms Pires said the region ought to offer training opportunities in order to keep pace with industry demand.

"The need for content has never been greater," she said.

"I find in my own work there isn't the skills base - everything from animators to special effects, graphic web developers ..."

"There needs to be training, there needs to be work locally and we have an opportunity to reinvent Wollongong as a technology city."

One of Film City's first productions is likely to be a documentary on Ms Lindrum's father, Horace Lindrum, world snooker champion and 33 times Australian billiards and snooker champion.

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