Illawarra teacher sets out on global quest

Mount Ousley Public School's assistant principal will spend the next five weeks immersed in science and maths as he heads overseas to study innovative programs for primary schools.

Neil Bramsen was last year awarded a Churchill Fellowship to explore new programs for primary students in science, technology, engineering and maths at schools and universities in the United States and United Kingdom.

Worth about $18,000, the fellowship allows Australians to take an overseas study tour that will benefit their community.

Mr Bramsen said science and maths had long been a focus at Mount Ousley, with students embarking on a number of significant projects, including making contact with the International Space Station.

"They love that sort of thing, it's the outdoor classroom and is just as valid as the indoor classroom. It gets them thinking logically, scientifically and you get better attention through that and learning from making mistakes," he said

Mr Bramsen will write a report when he returns to inform schools and teachers across the country on how to further engage students in maths and science.

"It will be put into action obviously at the class and school level, but to get that message out throughout the state and nation as well," he said.

"We're moving to a national curriculum in Australia. The science syllabus is implemented as of next year, so it's a way to revitalise science teaching. The timing is right for that sort of engaged, hands-on learning."

Mount Ousley Public School's assistant principal Neil Bramsen will head overseas this Saturday to investigate innovative science, maths and technology programs at schools in the UK and US. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

Mount Ousley Public School's assistant principal Neil Bramsen will head overseas this Saturday to investigate innovative science, maths and technology programs at schools in the UK and US. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

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