Albion Park's Logan Hindman boosts hospital fund-raiser

Home away from home: Cystic fibrosis sufferer Logan Hindman, 5, with mum Amanda and siblings Rubee and Blake, is one of the faces of the Sydney Children's Hospital's gold telethon campaign. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Home away from home: Cystic fibrosis sufferer Logan Hindman, 5, with mum Amanda and siblings Rubee and Blake, is one of the faces of the Sydney Children's Hospital's gold telethon campaign. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Sydney Children's Hospital is little Logan Hindman's "home away from home".

The Albion Park cystic fibrosis sufferer is one of the faces of the Randwick hospital's gold telethon campaign this year.

Now aged five, Logan spent his first four months at the hospital and has been back every six weeks since with his parents Amanda and Ben to attend the cystic fibrosis clinic.

He also has to be admitted for around two weeks at a time, a few times a year, so antibiotics can treat bacterial infections in his lungs.

Mrs Hindman said she was grateful to those who donated to the gold telethon, which helps the hospital buy life-saving equipment, fund research and deliver vital services to children across the state.

Organisers hope to raise $4.5 million this year through the fund-raising events during May combined with the live telethon held on Monday.

"We're just one of a number of families from this region who have to travel regularly to the Sydney Children's Hospital and we can't say enough about the hospital," Mrs Hindman said.

"They're amazing and they don't just offer support to Logan and to us, they are great with our other two children Blake and Rubee when they come to visit their brother too. They've been a lifesaver for us."

Logan was born eight weeks premature, which may well have saved his life.

"When he was born he stopped breathing, his right lung collapsed and his bowel was severely obstructed - it would have perforated and he would have died if I'd gone full-term," Mrs Hindman said. "I always say that he knew what he was doing when he came early."

Logan was transferred from Shoalhaven Hospital to the Sydney hospital where he needed four bowel operations, two blood transfusions and a ventilator to breathe for eight weeks.

Today he needs to take 30 tablets a day to aid digestion as well as other medication, has daily physiotherapy for his lungs and is fed milk through a gastrostomy tube each night.

He tires easily but is doing his best to keep up with his schoolmates after starting kindergarten at Kiama Public School this year.

"If he doesn't keep up, his little friends stop and wait for him to use his [inhaler] and then they all run off together again," Mrs Hindman said. "The students, staff and school have been wonderful."

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