Desexing time brings benefits for animals

Ben Holding and his dog, Ellie, at Balgownie Veterinary Hospital, prepare for pet national desexing month in July. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

Ben Holding and his dog, Ellie, at Balgownie Veterinary Hospital, prepare for pet national desexing month in July. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

Amorous pooches and pussy cats beware - July is national desexing month.

The campaign is an initiative of the National Desexing Network and encourages vets to offer discount rates to animal owners wanting to desex their pets.

NDN director Sylvana Wenderhold said since the down- turn in the economy, shelters and pounds around Australia were struggling, with more animals being handed in and fewer animals being adopted.

Balgownie Veterinary Hospital director Dr Stephanie Allison said owners should desex their animals for social reasons, as well as for the health of their pet.

"It reduces the unwanted litters we've got because we're always struggling with an overpopulation of cats and dogs," Dr Allison said.

"Behavioural issues are reduced, especially with male dogs. It reduces their tendency to want to wander and chase the girls.

"There are health reasons to desex both male and female dogs. In female dogs, mammary cancer is linked to high estrogen levels ... and in male dogs, we're reducing levels of male hormones, which reduces their risk of developing prostate cancer."

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop