Illawarra jobs that will be in hot demand

Health positions are among the jobs forecast to have the highest average growth over the next 20 years.

Health positions are among the jobs forecast to have the highest average growth over the next 20 years.

If you are a human resources manager, economist, teacher or optometrist in the Illawarra you are in luck, as jobs in your profession are set to grow in the next 20 years.

But if you are a betting clerk, pre-press worker, wood machinist, crop and livestock farmer or, worse still, a shearer, now might be a good time to get out of your industry.

Figures from Regional Development Australia Illawarra's new Transition Illawarra report released on Wednesday show how different occupations will change between now and 2033.

The report indicates the fastest growing sector will be healthcare, driven by the region's ageing population.

Education and training jobs are also expected to increase by about 3000 in the next 20 years, and strong growth is expected in the professional and administrative services industry, transport and hospitality.

When it comes to individual occupations, the positions forecast to have the highest average growth over the 20 years are middle school teachers (6.9 per cent), health and welfare service managers (5.2 per cent) and economists (5 per cent).

Looking at raw numbers, there will be 517 extra chief executives, 683 new nurses, 617 more human resources managers and 649 new university lecturers, according to the forecasts.

Jobs for midwives, retail managers, social workers and solicitors will also increase.

In bad news for many of the region's traditional industry workers, the report once again confirms manufacturing jobs will continue to shrink, with another 4000 forecast to all but disappear over the next 20 years.

However, some areas of the industry will be spared, with oil and fat manufacturing jobs recording an average growth of 2 per cent between 2010 and 2033, and minerals-based manufacturing growing 4.4 per cent.

In addition to showing overarching employment trends, the report shines a light on some of the niche occupations which are set to almost disappear in the next two decades.

For instance, the Illawarra of 2033 will only employ five betting clerks, compared with 27 in 2013 and, sadly, in the once rich agricultural region will employ just one shearer and five crop and livestock farmers.

There will be just five textile and footwear machine operators, and 13 graphic pre-press workers.

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