Before he became the Bulli rapist: Terry Williamson's path to depravity

The Bulli Rapist, Terry John Williamson (right), was convicted after his nine-month terror campaign throughout Wollongong.

The Bulli Rapist, Terry John Williamson (right), was convicted after his nine-month terror campaign throughout Wollongong.

Bulli rapist Terry John Williamson, centre, in 2012 after serving 22 years in jail for rapes in the northern suburbs of Wollongong.

Bulli rapist Terry John Williamson, centre, in 2012 after serving 22 years in jail for rapes in the northern suburbs of Wollongong.

• 5 more years: Judge extends supervision order on Williamson

Before becoming a sadistic rapist, Terry John Williamson was a stalker and voyeur who would break into women's homes at night and masturbate in their bedrooms while they slept.

Williamson used his job as a tow truck driver to follow his victims home, often returning to the scene to break in.

On one occasion he hid in bushes and exposed himself to a woman before chasing and touching her.

Diagnosed with multiple paraphilia Williamson was a sexual sadist and exhibitionist who would also gain gratification by making obscene telephone calls.

At the age of 20, when he felt he could no longer cope with other areas of his life, Williamson's sadistic sexual nature escalated to the brutal and violent rape or sexual assault of 10 females aged between five and 44 and an 11-year-old boy, either abducting them from the street or attacking them in their own homes.

For almost 10 months he instilled fear and terror in the Illawarra community, particularly those living between Bulli and Corrimal where most of his crimes were committed.

Williamson recently told a psychiatrist that he felt excitement and sexual gratification after the rapes and that had made up for his failure to cope with other aspects of life.

Williamson served 22 years behind bars before being released on parole in 2012.

In the NSW Supreme Court yesterday, the Department of Justice applied to have Williamson subject to an extended supervision order for a further five years.

Williamson did not appear in court but his barrister Matt Johnston said his client was not opposed to the order but agreed to it for only three years.

The court heard Williamson was doing well under supervision and was eager to be an example and prove that sexual offenders could be rehabilitated.

A psychiatric report showed Williamson was a polite and patient man with a positive attitude towards treatment. He had taken anti-libidinal medication to reduce his sex drive for 10 years and had chosen to participate in a sexual offenders treatment program while still in custody. He now sees a psychiatrist every week, although he is only required to attend once a fortnight.

Mr Johnston said Williamson had been compliant with his parole and supervision orders since being released from jail two years and four months ago.

"He has achieved a level of independence by his hard work and positive attitude and his desire to integrate into the community," Mr Johnston said.

He added that a further three years was adequate time for authorities to observe his treatment and integration.

But barrister for the NSW government, David Kell, argued five years was more appropriate.

He said psychiatric reports showed Williamson was clinically a high risk of reoffending and there were fears if he was to cease medication and become unable to cope with life, he would revert to deviant sexual behaviour.

He said if that occurred, Williamson could strike again without warning with "catastrophic consequences" and that his victim could be a woman or child.

His intense and overwhelming sexual arousals could lead to the possibility of further opportunistic sexual attacks and involve violent or excessive force, the court heard.

Mr Kell said experts agreed Williamson had a superficial understanding and less than full insight into his crimes and motives. His rehabilitation would be a long-term project and that it was likely his anti-libidinal medication would be continued indefinitely.

While the proposed supervision conditions do not specifically order Williamson to stay away from the Illawarra, the court heard that Corrective Services had made it a requirement of his supervision.

Documents, including medical reports, outlining Williamson's current personal details were not released to the media, with Justice Peter Johnson finding it may cause him to be stigmatised within the community, leading to a setback in his rehabilitation.

He added it was not in the community's interests to jeopardise Williamson's rehabilitation.

The statements of five victims were tendered to the court and will be taken into consideration by the judge when he hands down his decision on Thursday.

Petition to see Bulli rapist monitored for life

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