Wollongong Eisteddfod 2014: classical ballet

Full coverage of the eisteddfod

After an international dancing career and teaching hundreds of children ballet, Beverley Rowles was still thrilled when her 13 years and over Classical Ballet Mini Troupe  won first place in its category at the Wollongong Eisteddfod on Thursday.

‘‘I always had dancing and teaching in me because every child deserves to learn to dance,’’ Ms Rowles said.

Riley Lapham, 14, who attends a junior program in the Australian Ballet School said, ‘‘The school feels like a big happy second family because we are all really close friends. I always look forward to going.’’

The Beverely Rowles School of Dance celebrates with a win for their 55th anniversary. Picture: ADAM MCLEAN

The Beverely Rowles School of Dance celebrates with a win for their 55th anniversary. Picture: ADAM MCLEAN

Ms Rowles, 76, instilled her dancing passion in her son Marshall Rowles who now runs the school with his wife Amie, who helps teach.

‘‘It is fantastic to see them do well because we see the girls put in all the hard work,’’ Mr Rowles said.

Roughly 120 students aged between three and 17 attend the studio with past students now dancing with The Zurich Ballet, Switzerland, and Theatre Magdeburg, Germany, as well as companies within Australia, England and the United States.

The school primarily teaches ballet but showcases contemporary and modern expressive styles at eisteddfods.

 ‘‘It felt really special to win in a troupe for Beverley, especially because it is the 55th anniversary of the school,’’ Cara Crinnion, 14, said.

Mr Rowles said the Wollongong Eisteddfod had a great atmosphere because it was competitive and encouraged students to perform and train.

His mother added: ‘‘The attention to the skill of ballet and my love and passion are the keys to my studio’s and our dancers’ success.’’ 

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