Continental collision in 2014 World Cup decider

Germany supporters Konnor Stefanou, Marcus Bimbilovski, Tane Nunn and Ky Nunn. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

Germany supporters Konnor Stefanou, Marcus Bimbilovski, Tane Nunn and Ky Nunn. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

German Club’s Andrew Gunn, left, and 
Argentinian fan Javier Ayala share a beer in a friendly face-off.  Picture: GREG TOTMAN

German Club’s Andrew Gunn, left, and Argentinian fan Javier Ayala share a beer in a friendly face-off. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

WORLD CUP 2014

As a 15-year old, Javier Ayala can fondly remember the euphoria he felt when Diego Maradona led Argentina to an emotional 3-2 triumph over West Germany in 1986.

It was the last time Argentina held the World Cup.

Born in the Buenos Aires provincial town of Tigre, the now Corrimal resident moved to Australia when he was four and will celebrate his cultural heritage in the World Cup decider against Germany.

Almost three decades later, the father of two will be hoping another diminutive superstar can carry the nation to glory again.

"Lionel Messi - I guess a lot of the hopes are right on his shoulders," Ayala said.

"When you have the world's best player on your team there is always the prospect of getting a win."

While Ayala's Argentinian origins make his allegiance a mere formality, others had to delve deeper into the family tree.

Illawarra's German Club secretary-manager Andrew Gunn will draw on the lineage of his great-grandfather, but it won't make him any less passionate come kick-off.

"Germany will get it. I am pretty confident," Gunn said.

"After they beat Brazil 7-1 I think it is in Germany's hands, they just have to do it now.

"Probably the only threat is Messi.

"However, Germany is a strong team and the way they have been playing it probably isn't a huge threat."

Like many German fans, Gunn will spend Monday morning riding a wave of emotions at the German Club at Kembla Grange.

From the moment doors open from 4am, an avalanche of passion will be aimed at television screens for the biggest 90 minutes in international football.

"The atmosphere will definitely be here," Gunn said.

"We had a decent crowd for the semi-final and all of that crowd said they would be coming back again plus a heap of others."

While it mightn't have the same capacity, the Ayala lounge room is also likely to be bursting at the seams.

Javier, with children Caitlin and Lucas and Aussie-Italian wife Anna will set up camp as the Argentinian's attempt to break a near three decade World Cup drought.

"The nerves have already begun and I will definitely be up nice and early on Monday morning with the family," Ayala said.

He agreed German were the favourites to take the coveted prize.

"Anyone who annihilates Brazil rightly gets the favourites tag but Argentina have been growing throughout the tournament. Tactically they've improved and I think they are in with a good chance."

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