Gong on song for top tier

Australian triathlon team physiotherapist Alex Price putting Grace Musgrove through her paces at training this week. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

Australian triathlon team physiotherapist Alex Price putting Grace Musgrove through her paces at training this week. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

TRIATHLON

When it comes to the high-performance world of international triathlon, their Wollongong base is the reason behind a budding Australian resurgence, says team physiotherapist Alex Price.

In a sport entirely built on putting the human body through an ordeal it's simply not built for, Price has been greasing the wheels of the Australian team since 2007.

He's been to two Olympics and two Commonwealth Games, including this year's Glasgow Games.

His role has taken him all over the world but he says basing himself in Wollongong since 2003 has allowed him to work with some of the world's best athletes, including Australian pair Aaron Royle and Ryan Bailie and US triathlon queen Gwen Jorgensen, who train as part of Jamie Turner's elite international Wollongong Wizards squad.

"I'm based here most of the year in Wollongong as their physio but I travel with them to Europe when they're competing over there," Price said.

"We're pretty fortunate here in Wollongong because you've got Gwen who's the absolute top of the chain and we've got others who are literally the best in the world.

"They're regarded as the best in the world but everyone here takes it for granted a little bit.

"Wollongong over the last four years has become a bit of a hub during our summer. We've got trails to run, the beach to run on, the cycling's fantastic, we've got national parks and the URAC [University of Wollongong] here.

"It's why a lot of other top-class professionals even outside of that group are coming here to train."

It's a high-pressure role but being at the cutting edge is something Price relishes.

"In high-performance sport everyone's trying to win, so it's pretty cutthroat," he said.

"I need to be across a lot of things because your role transcends being physio a little bit when you're working with the best in the world.

"A big part of it is prevention. If they get injured it's too late, so my job is identifying things and addressing them before they become problems. It's a seven-day-a-week 24-hour-a-day thing and I love that elite level."

With the Glasgow Games behind them, Price and the team will now turn their attention to the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

"That's the next phase. I'll definitely stay in the job, I love it. I love being involved in sport at the highest level," he said.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop