Figtree woman skis 5th Avenue in historic NYC snowstorm

A snow-covered Renee Bartsch arrives at Central Park.

A snow-covered Renee Bartsch arrives at Central Park.

A Figtree woman caught up in New York City’s historic snow storm has told of her icy adventure of a lifetime.

As the streets emptied under a paralysing travel ban Saturday, cross country skiier and recent Williamsburg resident Renee Bartsch realised there was exploring to be done.

In a five-hour romp covering 12kms, she skied to McCarren Park in Brooklyn, up 8th Ave to Central Park, then swooshed uninterrupted down stylish 5th Avenue.

She later caught the subway home – caked in snow and the only passenger with a pair of skiis in hand.

“People were quite amused - pointing, taking photos, laughing, cheering, screaming even, commenting out loud 'you go girl', 'wow look at that', 'I wish I had a pair of those' or 'now that's smart',” Miss Bartsch told the Mercury.

A scene from Williamsburg at the height of the blizzard. Picture: Adam Day

A scene from Williamsburg at the height of the blizzard. Picture: Adam Day

“I wasn't expecting to make it far, as there was regular ploughing happening, but there was so much snow around, falling so heavily that the ploughs couldn't keep up

“Sure skiing in a blizzard isn't everyone's cup of tea, but when the best snow of the season ends up on your front door, you suit up, and make the most of it.

“I'm sure I'll never be able to do that again.”

Renee Bartsh returns to her snowed-in Williamsburg apartment after Saturday's epic romp.

Renee Bartsh returns to her snowed-in Williamsburg apartment after Saturday's epic romp.

The flurries lit up Central Park, where crowds of people gathered to toboggan and play in the snow. 

“The snow was seemed generally 50-60cm but there were deeper wind blow pockets of over one metre,” Miss Bartsch said. 

“I feel like the dogs loved it the most – bounding through the snow.

Not a cloud in the sky on Kent Street on Sunday as Brooklyn rebounds from the storm. Picture: Adam Day

Not a cloud in the sky on Kent Street on Sunday as Brooklyn rebounds from the storm. Picture: Adam Day

“They chased down balls in the deep powder – it was too thick and heavy for everyone else.”

A former St Mary College student, Miss Bartsch relocated to the Big Apple in early 2015 in line with her partner’s work transfer.

The two-day storm was dubbed "Snowmageddon".

A lone food delivery worker braves the night storm. Picture: Renee Bartsch

A lone food delivery worker braves the night storm. Picture: Renee Bartsch

It came just a few milimetres shy of the city’s worst dumping since 1869, when 68cm of snow was recorded. 

The city rebounded Sunday as Winter Storm Jonas weakened and headed into the Atlantic Ocean. 

Public buses and most subway lines were quickly restored, disappointing school children who cursed their luck at having a travel ban falling on a weekend.

Miss Bartsch awoke Monday with plans to ski again at nearby Prospect Park. 

A scene from Williamsburg. Picture: Adam Day

A scene from Williamsburg. Picture: Adam Day

“It [the snow] won’t last long!” she said.

Prospect Park on Sunday.

Prospect Park on Sunday.

The storm created a winter wonderland for visitors to Central Park. Picture: Renee Bartsch

The storm created a winter wonderland for visitors to Central Park. Picture: Renee Bartsch

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