Jamberoo Resort for sale: photos

In 2014 the Jamberoo Valley Resort went under a million dollar plus makeover, including dropping the “Valley” from its name.

Currently owned by a Chinese group, they’ve decided to let go of the asset set on nine acres of private grounds amidst lush bushland on the banks of Fryers Creek.

“Everyone’s got a memory of the place,” said selling agent Matt Davidson of Tourism Property.

“They know someone’s who’ve been married there or used to go to dinners there.”

Mr Davidson and his wife Kellie were married at the resort in 2002 so he set about the challenge of digging up information about the accommodation’s colourful past.

“Jamberoo Resort started life as Uncle Tom’s Hut in the 1960’s and was re-named Jamberoo Valley Lodge,” he said.

“We understand that the original Uncle Tom’s Hut, effectively a German restaurant and beer house, was the first venue in Australia to hold an Oktoberfest celebration.

“We were actually contacted by some folks involved in the original construction and swapped stories with some locals [and] there were quite a few snickers about some of the less publicized activities of days gone by.”

HISTORIC: The Jamberoo Resort, previous venue for 'Folk in the Foothills', is on the market with sale applications closing December 2. Picture: Georgia Matts

HISTORIC: The Jamberoo Resort, previous venue for 'Folk in the Foothills', is on the market with sale applications closing December 2. Picture: Georgia Matts

Another interesting feature is the 25 metre swimming pool, which according to Mr Davidson was built to accommodate the Australian Olympics swimming team.

“There’s a whole bunch of other stories that people don’t like to talk about so much,” he said, referring to rumours of escorts in the 1970’s and “executive retreat” stays for Sydney businessmen.

Nowadays the resort’s main focus is weddings but the new renovations also mean it can cater to conferences and family stays.

The resort features 43 four-star motel rooms (including two bridal suites), six conference rooms plus original restaurant and bar (currently closed), tennis court, new wedding ceremony garden, new playground with fitness circuit and climbing wall, and a large managers residence with three bedrooms and office space.

“We’re seeing some interest from non-profit organisations looking for a private retreat, but mainly it’s accommodation and functions operators who can see the business upside,” Mr Davidson said.

Offers close December 2.

Do you have memories of the Jamberoo Resort? Post them in the comments below.

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