Letters to the editor March 21 2017

CITY BACKDROP: The sun setting on Mt Keira from Figtree by Colin Markham.  Send your image to letters@illawarramercury.com.au or share it on our Facebook page.

CITY BACKDROP: The sun setting on Mt Keira from Figtree by Colin Markham. Send your image to letters@illawarramercury.com.au or share it on our Facebook page.

AN ALTERNATIVE SITE

In regards to the new ambulance station for Kiama, currently the existing station sits between Oak Flats and Bomaderry.

With a new station to come on line at Berry this would reduce the southern boundary for Kiama under normal call outs.

My idea would be to move the Kiama Station north to the old Bombo Public School site in Riverside Drive, corner of North Kiama Drive and Cathedral Rocks Avenue, Bombo.

The current site is a large grassed area, could have access from all three streets, has a short quick access to the Princes Highway in both directions, also a quick access to Riverside Drive heading North.

The area would be large enough to house a large station and staff car park.

This site would provide good radio communications.

Richard Cannan, Warilla

SUPPLY PROBLEM REAL

Planning for West Dapto has been under consideration by Wollongong City Council since about the mid 1980s, a period of some thirty years.

To date, planning has generated about 1000 lots an average of about 30 lots per year over the life of the planning process to date.

Council's present position is that it is unable to resolve the financial problems associated with the development of West Dapto.

Other than land which has already been designated for release, the council's present intention is that there will be no further land release in the West Dapto area.

In 2016, the release area was investigated by the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal.

The Tribunal made various recommendations on how to proceed with West Dapto but the recommendations are not acceptable to council.

The land supply problem is very real.

John Bisley, Wollongong

KEEPING COOL

A study carried out by the University of Melbourne, found the average wholesale electricity price soared to $134 a megawatt hour this summer, compared with $65-$67 in the two summers the carbon price was in place.

Curiosity got the better of me, I decided to fish out my electricity bill for the quarter ending February 2014 and make a comparison (same energy provider) with my recent bill for the quarter ending February 17. Quarter ending Feb 2014: usage 92 days kWh’s 1325. Discounts and Rebates $96.67. Amount due $333.16. Quarter ending Feb 2017: usage 98 days kWh’s 1802. Discounts and Rebates $63.09. Amount due $427.83.

Even taking into consideration (the extra six days) there has been a dramatic increase of electricity use in our household (2 persons) this summer—477 kilowatt hours.

The reason for the increase no doubt climate change, the record breaking heat, and the need to keep cool.

John Macleod, Berry

THE GLASS CEILING

Sally McManus has broken through a tough glass ceiling, she is the first woman to be elected Secretary of the ACTU. Her reply to a question about breaking the law is important. We owe our system, based on good laws and democracy, to heroic individuals who broke bad laws. It is interesting to note that Ms McManus' stand was opposed by Bill Shorten and Malcolm Turnbull.  The issue that prompted the question was a worker's right to strike.

Conservative governments always attack that right. The Menzies' government gaoled a union leader in 1956 for breaking a law.    It was strike action that released Clarrie O' Shea, the union official. He broke the law. His imprisonment led to national strikes that released him.  Appeals to the injustice had been rejected.   Strikes by their action break the law. While the billionaires enact the laws, unions have the right to break them. Good on you Sally McManus.

Reg Wilding, Wollongong

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