Wollongong resident highlights her cochlear implant success during Hearing Awareness Week

LIFE CHANGING: Wollongong resident Veronica Greenwood with friend and fellow cochlear implant recipient Bob Ross. She encourages people struggling with hearing to explore their options. Picture: Supplied

LIFE CHANGING: Wollongong resident Veronica Greenwood with friend and fellow cochlear implant recipient Bob Ross. She encourages people struggling with hearing to explore their options. Picture: Supplied

Wollongong resident Veronica Greenwood no longer has to shout because she can hear herself.

But the 60-year-old feels like shouting out how much better her life has been since she opted for a cochlear implant.

To coincide with Hearing Awareness Week (August 20-26), the RIDBC (Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children) used Mrs Greenwood to highlight that there is no age limit for a cochlear implant.

Ms Greenwood concurs, adding a cochlear implant has proven to be life changing.

‘’At my switch-on I was quite apprehensive as I was unsure whether it would work. I was pleasantly surprised when I first heard these ‘metallic’ sounds, a bit like someone plucking a banjo,’’ she said.

‘’The support I received at SCIC Cochlear Implant Program was tremendous. My life has changed dramatically and all of a sudden I have this wonderful self confidence that I had forgotten existed. I no longer shout because I can now hear myself.’’

I was pleasantly surprised when I first heard these ‘metallic’ sounds, a bit like someone plucking a banjo.

Veronica Greenwood

Today, one in six Australians is deaf, hearing impaired or has a chronic ear disorder.

But as technology advances, there are more possibilities than ever before for Australians with hearing loss to continue to enjoy their involvement in the community and prosper in their workplace.

RIDBC audiologist Eleanor McKendrick said cochlear implantation benefits included better communication, increased quality of life, improved speech recognition and greater independence for those with moderate-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss.

Ms Greenwood also recommends that anyone struggling with their hearing should investigate the options available.

‘’People will go their own way but if I were to cross their path I would definitely provide them with the positives of having 85 per cent of normal hearing for the rest of my life as opposed to no hearing at all,’’ she said.

‘’I am a very humble and thankful recipient of the gift of sound and now life is excellent.’’

Visit ridbc.org.au/scic or call 1300 658 981 for more details.