Albion Park Public School students’ ‘War on Waste’

WAR ON WASTE: Albion Park Public School students hold aloft the letters they have written to businesses, families and high schools as part of their war on waste campaign. Picture: Supplied

WAR ON WASTE: Albion Park Public School students hold aloft the letters they have written to businesses, families and high schools as part of their war on waste campaign. Picture: Supplied

Students from Albion Park Public School have reverted to a letter-writing campaign to kick-start their own war on waste.

The environmentally conscious students now want the NSW Government to follow the lead of other states which have or are in the process of phasing out single-use plastic shopping bags.

The WA Government this week announced it would phase out single-use plastic shopping bags from mid-next year.

Australians use up to an estimated 4 billion light-weight plastic bags a year. Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory and the ACT have already banned the bag.

We began by investigating our own practises at school and at home. Our discoveries were shocking! - Mik Calaizis

Albion Park Public School assistant principal Mik Calaizis said students in 5/6C have been writing letters to CEOs, business owners, store managers and school principals to increase awareness of recycling and composting.

Mr Calaizis and the students watched ABC documentary War On Waste and were inspired to start their own war.

‘’We began by investigating our own practises at school and at home. Our discoveries were shocking!’’ Mr Calaizis said.

’’Students realised that many schools in our area do not recycle plastic, only paper. Students were also shocked to discover how much food waste goes into bins that could be used in compost.’’

Their biggest battle was to help families, friends and teachers better understand ‘’why we must band together and educate local and national businesses about the plastic bags they offer customers’’.

‘’Plastic bags are a major problem and students wrote personal letters to franchisees, owners and CEOs to promote a ban on plastic bags and plead with them about the environmental implications plastic bags are having,’’ Mr Calaizis said.

Students contacted Bakers Delight, Harvey Norman, JB Hifi, Toys ‘r’ Us and even plastic bag manufacturers. Some also chose to write to local high schools, primary schools and their own school principal. All 26 students have hand written and mailed almost 50 letters.

We are awaiting responses and hope that we can continue our war on waste and begin a new culture in our school and community with recycling, composting and plastic bags. - Mik Calaizis

‘’Parents have described their children’s attitude towards recycling as passionate and endearing and feel their children are really excited about their journey. They have been very supportive,’’ he said.

‘’We are awaiting responses and hope that we can continue our war on waste and begin a new culture in our school and community with recycling, composting and plastic bags.’’

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