Reel Deal: Tips on how to fish the beaches

In the pink: Vanki Feher with a nice mowie from last Sunday's charter on MV Signa, Kiama. (Photos submitted for publication should be high res - about 1MB is ideal)

In the pink: Vanki Feher with a nice mowie from last Sunday's charter on MV Signa, Kiama. (Photos submitted for publication should be high res - about 1MB is ideal)

Luke from Leisure Coast Tackle at Corrimal said the influx of visitors for the school holidays must have brought the excellent weather with them and the shop has been very busy.

Information courtesy Bureau of Meteorology.

Information courtesy Bureau of Meteorology.

The beaches have been fishing very well and despite the lack of any serious swell, there are a few smallish gutters around that have been holding bream, flatties and of course salmon and tailor.

A good tip on finding a gutter is to visit your intending target beach during daylight and at dead low tide and look for darker coloured water.

Identify at each end of the gutter where the waves just don’t seem to break as well as along the rest of the beach.

This is usually where the water enters and leaves the gutter and can form into a rip or strong current so be careful.

At each end of the dark water, drag a stick backwards up towards and past high water mark, usually where there is flotsam, jetsam and sea weed.

When you come back later in the afternoon or predawn, look for your drag marks and you will know that the tide has filled the gutter as it has come in, but don’t shine any torch light into the water.

Fresh is best when it comes to bait with worms, pippies, whitebait and pillies all proving their worth.

But don’t overlook using a 10/15 or heavier gram lead jighead that can be cast and retrieved along the bottom of the shore break.

Some serious mulloway have fallen for these artificials so be prepared and rig a little heavier in the late evening or first light sessions.

The rocks have been hard going with the slack water but a steady berley trail of bread, tuna oil and fish frames etc should attract the bream, drummer and a few wrasse.

Offshore, the game boys have been tearing their hair out trying to find the elusive southern bluefin tuna that unfortunately look like they have done a runner and moved on.

However, a few yellowfin tuna have been caught and have been up towards the 50 kilogram mark but they too are few and far between.

For more information go to website: www.reeldealfishing.com.au

Contributions can be sent to email: gazwade@bigpond.com