Letters to the editor November 28 2017

FEATHERED FRIEND: A cuckoo-dove at Macquarie Pass by Kathy Mitchell Send us your photos to letters@illawarramercury.com.au or post to our Facebook page.
FEATHERED FRIEND: A cuckoo-dove at Macquarie Pass by Kathy Mitchell Send us your photos to letters@illawarramercury.com.au or post to our Facebook page.

WHEN RIGHT IS WRONG

I would like to comment on the Transport Minister and his Department regarding bus travel and costs. Firstly the Transport Minister lives on the far South Coast where he is lucky to see three buses each way per day and no trains. Bomaderry to Kiama train service to link up with the Electric Train Service to Sydney do not match so instead of readjusting the Bomaderry Service to link up it still runs these trains and then puts buses on at additional cost to do the train’s job.

Next it now has a Route 59 Premier Service from North Beach to Warilla, then to the airport stopping at all stops but is only allowed to pick up anywhere along the Route but can only drop off at the Airport, naturally it runs empty at whose cost.?

Why would anyone want to travel by Route 59 for around an hour to the airport, then travel for another hour and get into Melbourne when car travel is only around 20 minutes. The reason the free bus is being discontinued is because it is efficient and Transport is embarrassed by this word as it shows up their mistakes.

Richard Cannan, Warilla

TIMES HAVE CHANGED

Last Monday Four Corners on the ABC, did a story on Lionel Murphy. The report showed that as Attorney General Murphy championed the premise of individual freedom. On Q&A the debate was about individual freedom arising from the same-sex marriage bill. One side arguing that the individual should have the freedom to refuse a service whilst the other saying they do not, and, if they did refuse to provide the service, they should be prosecuted.

What appears to be lacking in the modern debate is the difference between the words "demand" and "request" and how they apply to individuals. If the service can be supplied by others then it is a "request" and consequently carries the Individual freedom to refuse to supply. If the service cannot be provided by others then the request can be treated as a "demand" and be subjected to action under the Discrimination Act.

The notion that "requests" under the provision of services to same sex couples should be limited to "religious freedom" takes away the "individual's freedom" of choice of the rest of society.

The YES campaign has called for the removal of restrictions on marriage to allow persons of the same sex to exercise their "individual freedom" of choice to marry but are now advocating that the rest of society must lose their individual freedom of choice to serve their "demands". It is now time to return to the time of the great social reformers, Gough Whitlam and Lionel Murphy, and ask the question, what has changed to allow one group to "demand" something that was once considered a "request".

Ian Young, East Corrimal

REVISE THE GST

About Four years ago I installed a modest 2000 watt Solar Power System on the roof, and joined the ever growing number of those Australians who are concerned with the way that the atmosphere of Mother Earth is being degraded by careless money hungry industries.

This little Solar System went quietly about its work, and low and behold, so far it has managed to coax 10.000 units of free, and clean, electricity out of the sun.

What gets right up my nose is that I got paid just a few cents for this electricity by Origin Energy, and even had to pay full GST on the power I bought from them, with no allowance whatsoever on my contribution to their profit bottom line. Politicians need to revisit this GST ogre and revise the unfair and unjust ways that my fellow Australians are getting ripped off by this ill conceived tax.  

The Chinese coal and power industry seem set to get tax breaks on using Chinese made railway lines to haul our coal from their proposed Queensland open cut coal monstrosity. Whatever happened to a ‘Fair Bloody Go’.

Dave Cox, Corrimal