The best places to live in Brisbane if you want food delivered

For younger home hunters, things like fitness facilities and internet are growing considerations when it comes to finding somewhere to live.

Peter Esho's start up CRIBZ has been collating information on fibre connectivity and fitness facilities, and, now, every couch potato's favourite, UberEATS availability.

Mr Esho planned to build a chatbot that directs buyers and renters to the suburbs that offer services that suit each user.

"Sure, access to services like UberEATS isn't yet a swing factor in choosing where to live," he said. "But we firmly believe it will become an increasing consideration, among many other factors, in the rental market over time."

Traditionally, a thriving restaurant scene would be a good indicator of amenable location to live in. Because of the new-found ability for eateries to reach a wider audience easily, savvy buyers and renters needed to think bigger, Mr Esho said.

"I think it's a small data point but indicative of a larger scene," he said. "I think the millennial generation is really looking at these services and utilities when talking about their quality of life."

The restaurant delivery service only covers less than one-third of Brisbane's suburbs, and as you'd expect, the further from the city centre you go, the fewer options hungry homebodies have.

Once you get past Carindale, Sunnybank, Kenmore, and Bracken Ridge, you're out of luck.

Predictably, the best suburbs for getting a late night snack delivered to your door were in the inner city, with Fortitude Valley, Newstead, West End, and Milton, which all earned a five-star rating from CRIBZ.

One of the factors Mr Esho's team considered when ranking the diversity of what was on offer, not just how much of it there was.

Because of this, suburbs south of the river took a bit of a hit in the standings. Sunnybank is CRIBZ's 8th best suburb for UberEATS, with a three star rating. The is despite a huge concentration of restaurants, most of which are east asian cuisines.

However, this pushed Chermside further up the list. It rated four stars and was in seventh place after Kangaroo Point and Paddington, both considerably closer to the CBD.

Mr Esho said the efforts by Westfield to build a food scene in their Chermside store had greatly increased the offering available, and had the potential to fill empty apartments.

"Areas where there's a big change from low density to high density, this is an important scene," he said. "There's a lot of doubt about who will live in these apartments, if there will be services for these people."

Last week, developers were reporting a surge in renters looking for well connected apartments in inner-city locations and estate agents were also noticing a similar trend with buyers.

Ray White Spring Hill's Sam Mayes said UberEATS wasn't a killer factor for people buying and renting in the area, but it was one of the amenities that sweetened the deal.

"It's something I use every single day so I rate it," Mr Mayes said. "It's one of the main ones. People pick the inner city apartments because the amenity's amazing."

As Brisbane builds up, inner city amenity will become a bigger factor for buyers, Mr Mayes said.

"Brisbane's growing rapidly, the traffic's getting worse," he said. "People like being closer to inner city schools and to be honest, all the major new destinations are in the inner city."

This story The best places to live in Brisbane if you want food delivered first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.