Book boost for Cringila PS ahead of Education Week

BOOK BOOST: Cringila Public School principal Amanda Giles with students Ali Mawassi and Finau Nisa. The school will get brand new books thanks to the Dymocks' Books for Kids campaign. Picture: Robert Peet
BOOK BOOST: Cringila Public School principal Amanda Giles with students Ali Mawassi and Finau Nisa. The school will get brand new books thanks to the Dymocks' Books for Kids campaign. Picture: Robert Peet

Cringila Public School is set to get a literacy boost just in time for Education Week (August 6-10).

For the second year running the school will benefit from Dymocks’ Books for Kids campaign.

From August 4 to 12 stores across the country will donate $1 from every children’s book bought to Dymocks Children’s Charities specialist literacy programs.

Dymocks Wollongong has chosen Cringila PS as the beneficiary of a Library Regeneration and Dymocks Children’s Charities will double the value of funds raised by the store in brand new books for the school library.

One of NSW’s most multicultural primary schools, Cringila was chosen because 80 per cent of its students have a language background other than English.

“We are just very grateful to Dymocks for selecting us,” principal Amanda Giles said.

“Reading is extremely important. It forms a basis for students’ learning in every KLA (key learning area).

“Not only do we want them to become expert readers but we also want them to develop a love of reading.

“Getting these books from Dymocks really enables us to provide rich quality text to our students to enhance their language and understanding of lots of things we learn about in books.”

Dymocks’ Library Regeneration program provides a wide range of high quality books chosen by the students and teachers.

The program aims to improve the students’ literacy skills by offering a wide range of stories and promoting daily reading for pleasure.

Dymocks Wollongong owner John Bernardi said the store worked closely with its local community and was committed to supporting literacy at a local level.

“Ensuring that all Australian children reach an appropriate level of literacy remains one of Australia’s greatest challenges.

“We’re proud to be working with Dymocks Children’s Charities to provide Cringila Public School with new and engaging books for their students,” Mr Bernardi said.

Dymocks Children’s Charities general manager Paul Swain said research unfortunately showed that most Australian school library budgets have either remained unchanged or declined in recent years.

“This means that old books aren’t being replaced and children don’t have access to new releases which keep them motivated as readers,” he said.

Cringila PS will celebrate Education Week with an open day on August 6 and a community read event the following day.

Education Week kicks off on Monday August 6, with a simultaneous launch at Parramatta and Kiama public schools live-streamed on YouTube.