Port Kembla to see hundreds of extra truck movements

A plan to send thousands of tonnes of soil from WestConnex to Port Kembla by rail will result in hundreds of truck movements once it gets here. Picture: Anna Kucera
A plan to send thousands of tonnes of soil from WestConnex to Port Kembla by rail will result in hundreds of truck movements once it gets here. Picture: Anna Kucera

Port Kembla will see as many as 225 truck movements a day under a Transport for NSW plan.

The government body is planning to send “virgin excavated natural material” dug up from the WestConnex project by rail to a site in Port Kembla.

From there it will be trucked to building developments in the region in need of clean fill.

The Transport for NSW plan is to send three freight-train loads of rock and soil from WestConnex to the BlueScope-owned Commonwealth Rolling Mills site.

Each freight train will be carrying 3000 tonnes of soil and rock dug up as part of the WestConnex project.

Transport for NSW has implied there would not be daily deliveries of excavated material, nor will it be stockpiled at the CRM site – because it would only be sent if there was an already-identified location to use it.

The planned three train-loads would see hundreds of extra truck movements in and out of Port Kembla.

Transport for NSW said it chose rail over road to reduce the number of truck movements.

But the determination report admits trucks will be used after the soil arrives in Port Kembla.

“Truck movements would occur following the train delivery with each train delivery requiring around 85 trucks,” the report said.

“These trucks would continue to operate as required to remove the spoil from the site and deliver it to the agreed location.”

With 85 trucks required to offload one train, that means the planned three train-loads would see hundreds of extra truck movements in and out of Port Kembla.

The report stated these extra movements would be planned to “avoid impacts where possible”.

“Consideration includes truck access routes and using major arterial roads as much as possible, scheduling truck movements to avoid peak traffic periods and noise impacts on local roads,” the report stated.

“The proposal has been assessed as being unlikely to have a noticeable increase on traffic noise levels.”

The start date for the project is not known at the moment, as there are other approvals needed before it can begin.