Speeding Memorial Drive motorists pay a hefty price

High-range speeders along Memorial Drive account for a huge chunk of revenue from the speed cameras. Picture: Kirk Gilmour. Story. Glen Humphries
High-range speeders along Memorial Drive account for a huge chunk of revenue from the speed cameras. Picture: Kirk Gilmour. Story. Glen Humphries

Just 12 drivers were responsible for almost 20 per cent of the fine revenue from the Memorial Drive speed cameras.

According to figures from the Office of State Revenue, the speed camera capturing northbound speeders raked in $88,547 in the 2017-18 financial year.

The counterpart monitoring southbound traffic took in $64,054.

In terms of revenue, they are way down the list of 17 Illawarra cameras, at 14th and 16th respectively.

The combined revenue for the cameras was $152,601.

And just a dozen drivers contributed 18.7 per cent of that total – $28,608.

Those are the drivers caught speeding along that stretch of Memorial Drive at 45km/h over the speed limit.

That means they're travelling at least 125km/h.

Four drivers were caught on the southbound side, and double that on the north – and they each copped a $2384 fine.

What happens if you add in the 14 drivers pinged for going 30-45km/h over the limit?

That takes the combined fine total to $40,984, or 26 per cent of all revenue from those cameras.

That means just 26 speeding drivers along Memorial Drive accounted for just over a quarter all all fines detected by those cameras.

Transport for NSW stated the high fines are designed to act as a deterrent to stop people speeding.

“All drivers have a responsibility to follow the road rules including driving at the speed limit,” a Transport for NSW spokeswoman said.

Those high-range speeders notwithstanding, Transport for NSW stated the Memorial Drive speed cameras have had an effect on driver behaviour.

When the cameras were installed in 2002, they picked up an average of 700 infringements a month.

In 2018, that monthly average is down to less than 50 a month.

There has also been an 11 per cent reduction in casualty crashes when comparing the five years before installation to the five years up to the end of 2016.

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