Windang Road speeding fines rise despite 60km/h limit

The suddenly controversial red-light speed camera at the intersection of Windang Road and Boronia Avenue. Picture: Robert Peet
The suddenly controversial red-light speed camera at the intersection of Windang Road and Boronia Avenue. Picture: Robert Peet

Despite the claims of “revenue raising” caused by the reduced speed limit on Windang Road, fines from that speed camera show speeding has gotten worse along that stretch.

In fact, even had there been no change in the speed limit, there would have been a large spike in the number of people fined for low-range speeding compared to the previous period.

On Wednesday the Mercury broke the news that the red-light speed camera at the intersection of Windang Road and Boronia Avenue had raked in $1.13 million in speeding fines the 2017-18 financial year.

This compared to  $125,079 in the previous year.

The almost tenfold increase in speeding fines was put down to the fact the speed limit in the area where the camera is located was in May 2017 dropped from 70km/h to 60km/h.

Despite news stories about the change and signage in the area last year, some motorists only realised this week the speed limit had been dropped.

However, even without the speed reduction, there has still been a sharp increase in the number of drivers caught speeding by the camera in the last financial year.

It is the two low-range speed bans where the majority of the 6634 speeders were caught.

There were 4841 motorists caught travelling up to 10km/h over the speed limit.

That would put them at a maximum speed of 70km/h – the old speed limit, which prompted some Mercury readers to claim the reduction in the speed limit was just “revenue raising”.

When it came to those going between 10 and 20km/h over the 60km/h speed limit the figure was 1701.

That means there were still 1700 motorists travelling between 70-80km/h through the Windang CBD – all of which would have still been pinged for speeding had the limit remained unchanged.

In 2016-17 the number of people clocked by the camera travelling between 70-80km/h was just 327.

Which equates to a 427 per cent increase in low range speeding.

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