Wollongong midwife reflects on career

Delivery: Midwife Michelle Smid delivers newborn Bella Lee to the loving arms of her mother Tenneile Meyers. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Delivery: Midwife Michelle Smid delivers newborn Bella Lee to the loving arms of her mother Tenneile Meyers. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Wollongong Hospital midwife Michelle Smid has assisted in the delivery of hundreds of babies - sometimes six in one shift - but it still brings tears to her eyes.

Busy bringing another new baby into the world on International Midwives' Day on Monday, Ms Smid was able to take time out to reflect on a fulfilling 20-year career.

"To witness new life is so exciting and I consider it a privilege to assist women and their families throughout pregnancy, birth and beyond," she said.

"Some of the most memorable births for me have been when women have had high-risk pregnancies, or have struggled with IVF for years, or are single mums, and they then deliver a healthy, full-term baby - these are very emotional deliveries.

"But I'm always emotional, I happily cry with the parents and the newborn."

Ms Smid is one of thousands of midwives, clinical midwifery educators, midwifery consultants, managers and student midwives who are recognised on the day which is observed in more than 50 countries.

NSW Nurses and Midwives Association general secretary Brett Holmes said it was an opportunity to appreciate those who worked tirelessly to ensure the safe arrival of newborns around the world.

"With a baby born every one minute and 42 seconds across Australia we know just how invaluable the contribution midwives make towards the health and well-being of our community," Mr Holmes said.

"The role midwives play providing support, care and advice to mothers bringing new life into the world is extraordinary."

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