World Cup 2014: Socceroos must give their all against Chile

Socceroos captain Mile Jedinak kicks during an Australian training session in Vitoria. Picture: GETTY IMAGES

Socceroos captain Mile Jedinak kicks during an Australian training session in Vitoria. Picture: GETTY IMAGES

WORLD CUP 2014

The Socceroos need to treat their World Cup opener against Chile as if it were their last match, skipper Mile Jedinak says.

After weeks of intense training, Friday's clash couldn't come any sooner for Jedinak.

Australia arrived in Brazil on May 28, almost a week before any other foreign team.

Most of the squad have been in camp for almost a month, having kicked off their preparations on the Central Coast in mid-May.

Jedinak says they're all itching to get their campaign under way against the world No 13 South Americans in Cuiaba.

"The hard work is still going on, but it's great a game is finally coming around," he said following training on Monday.

"It's final preparations now ... it's all about Friday and getting everyone on the same page.

"We've been doing it for three to four weeks and you can see the progress."

The Socceroos continued to work on their formation in training on Monday with the physical intensity clearly tapered.

Mark Bresciano moved well and looks unhindered by his back issue.

Bresciano proved himself a difference-maker in his solid 30-minute spell against Croatia last week.

While Jedinak says it would be a huge boost to have the veteran midfielder play against Chile, he feels they'll be covered if he can't.

"I've been asking him every day in training how he's feeling and he says he's doing well - you can see it in training today," he said.

"He's moving freely and getting on the ball ... that's very encouraging.

"In saying that, everyone's champing at the bit to get out there and play an important part in a crucial game."

Chile shapes as the most important game for Australia.

With clashes against the Netherlands (June 18) and Spain (June 23) to follow, getting a result - win or draw - against Chile will keep the Socceroos alive until their final group game.

"You have to take each game like it's going to be your last," he said.

"The first one is our priority. We have to have that mentality, to get something from that game and then see where it takes you," Jedinak said

In a boost for the Socceroos, Chile are likely to be missing influential midfielder Arturo Vidal, who is still suffering inflammation on his knee after having surgery last month.

With other dangerous midfielders - including the likes of Marcelo Diaz, Charles Aranguiz and Vidal's likely replacement Felipe Gutierrez - Jedinak knows they'll be just as tough.

"You go through their squad, he's one player - he's important yes but they have many players at a good level, especially in his position," Jedinak said.

"They're very strong. We have to prepare for whether he's playing or not," he said.

Having been tucked away in the small, relatively quiet coastal city of Vitoria - a city not hosting any World Cup action - the Socceroos have been sheltered from the hype that surrounds the showpiece sporting event.

Jedinak acknowledges the enormity of the experience may not have dawned on some of the younger players and is prepared to help calm their nerves.

"So far I've done my talking on the pitch, there might come a time when I have to say something in front of the group," he said.

"We all know the importance of this. It might hit some guys at different times."

The Socceroos will have a day off training on Tuesday before they fly out to Cuiaba the following day. AAP

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop