Boris Georgiou takes coffee tips on the road

Delano Coffee's Boris Georgiou with barista Emma Terechous. Georgiou is heading to Sydney this month to the Rocks Aroma Festival, to teach people the secrets of brewing better coffee at home. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

Delano Coffee's Boris Georgiou with barista Emma Terechous. Georgiou is heading to Sydney this month to the Rocks Aroma Festival, to teach people the secrets of brewing better coffee at home. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

Boris Georgiou likes a good cup of coffee so much, he makes sure he takes his own equipment everywhere he goes.

Georgiou, who works at North Wollongong's Delano Coffee, says it's part of the reason he's managed to avoid drinking instant coffee for at least six years.

"I have a little travel kit that I take with me," Georgiou says.

"It's this leather satchel - it's got a little hand grinder, a filter brewing tool called an Aeropress and a little scale and some fresh coffee beans. So pretty much all I need is some hot water wherever I go and I can have my own coffee."

Then Georgiou gives a reason to avoid instant coffee, because every cup has in effect been made twice.

"One thing a lot of people might not know is instant coffee is actually already-brewed coffee," he said.

"They mass-brew the coffee and then dehydrate it, and what's left behind is instant coffee. So when you take instant coffee and you add it to hot water, you're just taking coffee and re-diluting it."

Delano started out as a coffee roastery selling to cafes but, in the last two years it has moved to a focus on retail as well - on top of its own cafe in Montague Street, North Wollongong.

Delano Coffee has also participated at The Rocks Aroma Festival - a tribute to the coffee bean and the beverage it creates.

At last year's one-day festival, Georgiou said the Delano staff manning the stand were run off their feet. He says Delano went through 52 kilograms of coffee on the day and the six baristas manning two different coffee machines cranked out an average of 4.8 coffees a minute from 10am to 5pm.

Ahead of this year's festival, Georgiou will also be holding an education session for those wanting to make better coffee at home.

"We treat the festival as a fun day out but it's also a bit of an educational experience," he says.

"In the lead-up to the event, I'm going to be teaching classes in The Rocks about brewing coffee and how to get the best out of brewing methods at home. On the day we've got two stands running there. We're going to run a filter coffee bar and an espresso coffee bar."

He says the idea is to show people different ways to make a coffee and highlighting the advantages of each.

Regardless of the method used, Georgiou says there are two big tips people can use to improve their home-brewed coffee.

"The first one is not buying pre-ground coffee," he says. "Coffee is an organic substance, it's fairly volatile and its quality degrades when it oxidises. If you buy coffee to brew at home, probably the most important thing you can buy is a grinder. Grinding on demand is huge to enjoying good coffee at home.

"The other thing is water quality. I recommend to anyone who is brewing coffee at home to use bottled water from the shops. The mineral content in water can affect flavour and can affect how well you can extract coffee.

"Drinking water from the shops generally has the right composition."

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