New look for controversial Bulli KFC plan

An image taken from a heritage report attached to KFC's amended plans showing the view of the proposed food chain from the Princes Highway, looking from the direction of the Bulli Conservation Area.
An image taken from a heritage report attached to KFC's amended plans showing the view of the proposed food chain from the Princes Highway, looking from the direction of the Bulli Conservation Area.

A controversial proposal to build a KFC in Bulli has resurfaced with a new look, after it divided residents in the northern suburb late last year.

Six months after the fast-food chain plans were first lodged, they are back under assessment with Wollongong City Council.

Developers submitted dozens of new documents at the request of the council and Roads and Maritime Services (RMS), addressing concerns about traffic, waste management and the heritage impact of the multinational chicken franchise.

The building has also been redesigned, according to the documents, replacing grey prefab panels with brickwork, timber boarding, awnings and a vine-covered pergola to “mitigate” the way the it looks from Bulli’s heritage conservation area.

Read more: Bulli KFC will bring hundreds of cars to Bulli – report

The chicken eatery’s plans to open at the site of Bulli Woolworths were revealed in December, and prompted protests from a small group of residents, who worried about the effects the outlet could have on the environment, their community, heritage and children’s eating habits.

This then sparked a counter movement of more than 1000 people who supported a Facebook page called Yes to KFC in Bulli.

Read more: 'Cluck off' - KFC critics flip Colonel the bird

The heritage assessment concluded that the fast food plan would “have no adverse impact on the heritage significance of the Bulli Heritage Conservation Area”.

Also newly lodged, a waste management assessment reveals the chain would throw away three cubic metres of food waste each week, and would drain 20 litres of “fatty solids” into drains in the same period. One cubic metre each of cans and glass and two cubic metres of paper would be recycled.

The new version of the plans will be open for public comment until July 5.