Dalfram dispute: $100k monument to commemorate Port Kembla wharfies strike

Desiree Savage
Updated January 7 2018 - 8:09am, first published January 5 2018 - 2:30pm
In November 1938 waterside workers refused to load iron onto a ship on the grounds that it would be used to make bullets and bombs for the Japanese war against China. The dispute led to Robert Menzies being called "Pig Iron Bob". When Menzies went to Wollongong in 1939, police called on communist union leaders to help him through a crowd of hostile workers. Photo taken in January 1939. Picture: Fairfax Photo Library/Norman Brown
In November 1938 waterside workers refused to load iron onto a ship on the grounds that it would be used to make bullets and bombs for the Japanese war against China. The dispute led to Robert Menzies being called "Pig Iron Bob". When Menzies went to Wollongong in 1939, police called on communist union leaders to help him through a crowd of hostile workers. Photo taken in January 1939. Picture: Fairfax Photo Library/Norman Brown

Several years ago it was suggested to filmmaker Sandra Pires she delve into a stand-off at Port Kembla in 1938, a protest against mass genocide. She was captivated.

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